FAQ

How long as Italy been producing wine?

Italy’s wine cultural goes back thousands of years to before even the Roman Empire. They are one of the oldest producers of wine in the entire world.

What is the most-produced type of Italian wine?

This is a tricky question. The grapes that are grown in Italy are often exported themselves to be included in other wines around the world. The best-known Italian wine comes from the Veneto area, which is known for Pinot Grigio. They also produce the grapes that go into sauvignon blanc and cabernet sauvignon.

Can you go on wine tastings in Italy?

Absolutely. There are so many different distributers and orchards all over the country and they are all very willing to have you come and enjoy their wine with them while they give you a tour if you would like. Usually there is bread or some other small bites of food offered as well.

Who imports Italian wine?

The biggest importer in the world for Italian wine is the United States. We really are enthusiastic about our wine in general, but have a great love for Italian wine.

Is Italy a big exporter on the global market in wine?

Yes. In fact, in 2015, Italy exported more wine than any other country in the world.

Who makes the most wine in the world?

Believe it or not, the biggest producer of wine in the world is actually France. They just do not export as much as Italy does, because they enjoy their own wines themselves.

Chianti is always so cheap, is it really not good wine?

Chianti used to be associated as some cheap table wine that you could have with just any sit down dinner. That is still the case of course, but the quality of wine that is being produced is remarkable to say the least. It may have been previously thought of as lower-end wine sold with a husk and some wax closing it off, but that is not the case anymore. True you can still find that type of bottle in any store of course.

Is Italian wine better than French wine?

This is all a matter of opinion. Their climates are not entirely similar so even though there is an overlap between the two in terms of grape varieties, the flavors that come out of each country are in no way identical. I think that they both have their place in the world and both should be respected and appreciated. They all should be drank as well of course.

How will I know if I like Italian wine?

You will have to first buy a bottle or try some wine somewhere in order to know whether you are a fan of the wine or not. There is not a magical method involved in this situation.

Why don’t I hear as much about Italian wine?

It mostly depends on where you are located in the world. But Italian wine fell off of the map for a while, but has definitely come back into popularity.

 

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